Officials & Marshals

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Every sporting event organised by the British Automobile Racing Club (BARC) needs marshals and all marshals, whatever they are doing, are contributing to the success of the event and the smooth running of the organisation. Marshalling is a way in which enthusiasts can become actively involved, and contribute to the sport.

As a BARC Marshal you will be given training in all aspects of the Sport, from Fire Safety to correct Radio Operation and Team Working. Speciality fields are available in the Pit Lane, Rescue Units and other areas.

This section of the website is a comprehensive guide to marshalling.

What is a Marshal?

Marshals enable the safe and efficient operation of motorsports events. As a Marshal, you will be given ample training in all aspects of the sport, from fire fighting and first aid to radio operation and team working. As well as working on Marshals posts around the track, speciality roles are available in the Pit Lane, Paddock and other areas.

Most UK Race Circuits and many of the hillclimb and sprint venues hold BARC meetings every year.

To start with you will be working with experienced Marshals who will provide 'on the job' training in addition to the formal training sessions held around the country.

How do I get involved?

If you are interested in becoming a Marshal then email the BARC Officials Secretary, Paula Brown, on pbrown@barc.net or call her on 01264 882210 and she will be able to provide details of what you need to do next. If you are off to an event tomorrow then talk to one of the Marshals and they will be happy to talk to you about what they do and what's involved.

What do I need?

To start with you just need to wear natural fibres, cotton, wool, denim etc. that don't clash with the flag colours (yellow, red, green, blue), some stout footwear (walking boots are ideal) and some gloves (welders gauntlets or leather gardening gloves are fine). Don't spend lots of money on kit until you have spent a couple of days Marshalling to make sure you enjoy it (we are confident that you will), anything that you don't have can probably be borrowed, Marshals are a very friendly bunch.

2017 Formula 1 GP Marshals' Nomination Form

Download the nomination form, complete it and return to the BARC
2017 F1 GP Marshals' nomination form

Trainee Marshal

This is the level at which everybody starts marshalling. The grades are a way for other Marshals to gain an idea of your level of experience; they are not a reflection of your ability.

Upgrading from Trainee Marshal to Track Marshal requires you to have gained signatures for 15 days of track and flag duties plus one training day covering firefighting, flagging and basic marshalling, all of which are delivered at the BARC Marshals training days. Once you have completed this then you will be assessed by an Examining Post Chief over 2 days, one day for flagging and one day for incident duties. You will need to advise the BARC that you would like to be assessed so that they can notify the Chief Marshal for the event to make the arrangements for you. The assessments are in no way onerous and are intended to make sure that you are ready for the additional responsibility.

The assessment is an open discussion; it should be seen as a learning event with constructive criticisms being given during the day. These will ensure that you are ready for your upgrade and should round out the experience you have already gained.

Track Marshal

Track Marshals work in a team and are responsible for dealing with incidents, moving cars and ensuring that their 'sector' of the track is clear.

To upgrade from Track Marshal to Experienced Marshal you will need to have signatures from 20 days of marshalling doing both flag and track duties, each must be for a minimum of 5 days. In addition you must have attended two training days covering the firefighting, flagging, incident and first aid modules from the MSA grading scheme.

Once you have collected the required number of signatures for attendance and training then you will need to ask the BARC to arrange for an upgrading assessment. This will be held over 2 days to allow an Examining Post Chief to assess your flagging and incident handling skills.

Experienced Marshal

As an Experienced Marshal you will be taking the lead with incident handling and can expect to be mentoring other Marshals. Once graded as an Experienced Marshal you can choose an upgrading path, either becoming a Post Chief, an Incident Officer or a Flag Marshal.

If you would like to become a Post Chief then you will have to get 20 attendance signatures as Post Chief plus attending 2 training days where the firefighting, flag, Incident Officer, report writing, communication and leadership modules are included.

In order to upgrade to Incident Officer, you need to have 20 days as an IO signed off and will have attended a training day, which needs to include firefighting, Incident Officer, report writing, communication and leadership modules.

If you want to upgrade to Flag Marshal then you will need signatures for 15 days acting as a Flag Marshal and must have a training day signed off which must have included flagging, report writing and communication modules.

The BARC can arrange your assessment, just one day, but you will need to request it in advance so that you can be allocated to work with an Examining Post Chief.

Incident Officer

As an Incident Officer you will be leading teams of Marshals dealing with on-track incidents and will be responsible for coaching and developing their skills.

In order to upgrade to Post Chief, you will have to get 20 attendance signatures as Post Chief plus attending 2 training days where the firefighting, flag, Incident Officer, report writing, communication and leadership modules are included.

Your assessment will need to be arranged with the BARC as before.

Flag Marshal

Flag Marshals are responsible for communicating with drivers through the use of flag signals and signs. They also support the Post Chief by acting as additional eyes and ears.

In order to upgrade to Post Chief, you will have to get 20 attendance signatures as Post Chief plus attending 2 training days where the firefighting, flag, Incident Officer, report writing, communication and leadership modules are included.

Your assessment will need to be arranged with the BARC as before.

Post Chief

The Post Chief is the most senior marshal on any individual marshals post. They are responsible for managing their team and ensuring that they are prepared for the day ahead. This includes making sure that all members of the team know what they should be doing, how to do it safely, are comfortable in their role, or are properly supervised by a more experienced Marshal, and confirming that all of the equipment required for the day is available and in good order.

During track sessions, the Post Chief acts as an observer; they will report to race control things such as serious incidents, hazards and rule infringements.

Upgrades to Examining Post Chief require signatures for 20 days as Post Chief plus 2 training day signatures, which must include the self-assessment, leadership and mentoring modules.

An upgrade to Examining Post Chief requires that you are nominated by your club and must be approved by the MSA.

Examining Post Chief

Examining Post Chiefs perform the same duties as Post Chiefs and are additionally empowered to assess and approve upgrades for other Marshals.

Speed Events

Trainee Marshal

This is the level at which everybody starts marshalling. The grades are a way for other Marshals to gain an idea of your level of experience, they are not a reflection of your ability.

Upgrading from Trainee Marshal to Speed Marshal requires you to have gained signatures for 15 days of track and flag duties plus one training day covering firefighting, flagging and basic speed marshalling, all of which are delivered at the BARC Marshals training days. Once you have completed this then an Examining Speed Marshal will assess you. You will need to advise the BARC that you would like to be assessed so that they can notify the Chief Marshal for the event to make the arrangements for you. The assessment is intended to make sure that you are ready for the additional responsibility. The assessment is an open discussion; it should be seen as a learning event with constructive criticisms being given during the day. These will ensure that you are ready for your upgrade and should round out the experience you have already gained.

Speed Marshal

Speed Marshals work in a team and are responsible for dealing with incidents, moving cars and ensuring that their 'sector' of the track is clear.

To upgrade from Speed Marshal to Experienced Speed Marshal you will need to have signatures from 20 days of marshalling doing both flag and track duties, each must be for a minimum of 5 days. In addition you must have attended two speed training days covering the firefighting, flagging, incident and first aid modules from the MSA grading scheme.

Once you have collected the required number of signatures for attendance and training then you will need to ask the BARC to arrange for an upgrading assessment by an Examining Speed Marshal.

Experienced Speed Marshal

As an Experienced Speed Marshal you will be taking the lead with incident handling and can expect to be mentoring other Marshals.

If you would like to become a Speed Post Chief then you will have to get 20 attendance signatures as Speed Post Chief or deputy plus attending 2 training days where the report writing, communication and leadership modules are included.

The BARC can arrange your assessment, just one day, but you will need to request it in advance so that you can be allocated to work with an Examining Speed Marshal.

Speed Post Chief

The Speed Post Chief is the most senior marshal on any individual marshals post. They are responsible for managing their team and ensuring that they are prepared for the day ahead. This includes making sure that all members of the team know what they should be doing, how to do it safely, are comfortable in their role, or are properly supervised by a more experienced Marshal, and confirming that all of the equipment required for the day is available and in good order.

During track sessions, the Speed Post Chief acts as an observer; they will report to control things such as serious incidents, hazards and rule infringements.

Upgrades to Examining Speed Marshal require signatures for 20 days as Speed Post Chief plus 2 training day signatures, which must include the firefighting, report writing, self-assessment, leadership and mentoring modules.

An upgrade to Examining Speed Marshal requires that you are nominated by your club and must be approved by the MSA.

Experienced Speed Marshal

Examining Speed Marshals perform the same duties as Speed Post Chiefs and are additionally empowered to assess and approve upgrades for other Speed Marshals.

Rescue & Medical

Doctors

All our race events need Doctors to provide the high level of emergency medical support that our competitors have come to expect.

We provide ongoing training and support to all of our team members to ensure that they do not find themselves in unfamiliar scenarios.

Any Doctors who are interested in joining our Medical team should email our Rescue Coordinator, Martin Hunt on rescue@barc.net in the first instance.

Paramedics

The BARC works with Paramedics as a key element of our Medical Team and provides exciting opportunities to attend some of the highest profile motorsport events in the world.

Once registered with the MSA, Paramedics benefit from medical malpractice insurance when working as a volunteer at an event.

Any Paramedics who are interested in joining our Medical team should email our Rescue Coordinator, Martin Hunt on rescue@barc.net in the first instance.

Rescue

The BARC operates nine Rescue Units around the country, which attend events of various types including races, sprints, hillclimbs and rallies. The purpose of a Rescue Unit is to get trained crewmembers and their equipment to the scene of an incident when called to assist. At a race circuit, this should be within 90 seconds of being dispatched.

Rescue crewmembers are Marshals who undergo training in medical skills, extrication and mechanical rescue.

They work with Doctors and Paramedics and use their knowledge and skills to extricate an injured or trapped driver.

The MSA requires that a Rescue Unit at a race meeting must have 3 licensed crew members and a Doctor or Paramedic. There can also be up to two trainees on the unit.

The BARC has minimum requirements for acceptance as a Rescue Trainee, these exceed the MSA minimum requirements and therefore you must have 2 years marshaling experience, have attended 2 Marshals training days including firefighting and preferably hold a valid first aid certificate.

If you meet the criteria and would like to become a Rescue Trainee then we will arrange for you to spend some time working on a Rescue Unit at events to see if you like it before committing to the large amount of time required to qualify.

If you are interested in joining BARC Rescue then please email our Rescue Coordinator, Martin Hunt on rescue@barc.net.

Non-Trackside

Trainee Marshal

This is the level at which everybody starts marshalling. The grades are a way for other Marshals to gain an idea of your level of experience, they are not a reflection of your ability.

Upgrading from Trainee Marshal to Speed Marshal requires you to have gained signatures for 15 days of track and flag duties plus one training day covering firefighting, flagging and basic speed marshalling, all of which are delivered at the BARC Marshals training days. Once you have completed this then an Examining Speed Marshal will assess you. You will need to advise the BARC that you would like to be assessed so that they can notify the Chief Marshal for the event to make the arrangements for you. The assessment is intended to make sure that you are ready for the additional responsibility. The assessment is an open discussion; it should be seen as a learning event with constructive criticisms being given during the day. These will ensure that you are ready for your upgrade and should round out the experience you have already gained.

Speed Marshal

Speed Marshals work in a team and are responsible for dealing with incidents, moving cars and ensuring that their 'sector' of the track is clear.

To upgrade from Speed Marshal to Experienced Speed Marshal you will need to have signatures from 20 days of marshalling doing both flag and track duties, each must be for a minimum of 5 days. In addition you must have attended two speed training days covering the firefighting, flagging, incident and first aid modules from the MSA grading scheme.

Once you have collected the required number of signatures for attendance and training then you will need to ask the BARC to arrange for an upgrading assessment by an Examining Speed Marshal.

Experienced Speed Marshal

As an Experienced Speed Marshal you will be taking the lead with incident handling and can expect to be mentoring other Marshals.

If you would like to become a Speed Post Chief then you will have to get 20 attendance signatures as Speed Post Chief or deputy plus attending 2 training days where the report writing, communication and leadership modules are included.

The BARC can arrange your assessment, just one day, but you will need to request it in advance so that you can be allocated to work with an Examining Speed Marshal.

Speed Post Chief

The Speed Post Chief is the most senior marshal on any individual marshals post. They are responsible for managing their team and ensuring that they are prepared for the day ahead. This includes making sure that all members of the team know what they should be doing, how to do it safely, are comfortable in their role, or are properly supervised by a more experienced Marshal, and confirming that all of the equipment required for the day is available and in good order.

During track sessions, the Speed Post Chief acts as an observer; they will report to control things such as serious incidents, hazards and rule infringements.

Upgrades to Examining Speed Marshal require signatures for 20 days as Speed Post Chief plus 2 training day signatures, which must include the firefighting, report writing, self-assessment, leadership and mentoring modules.

An upgrade to Examining Speed Marshal requires that you are nominated by your club and must be approved by the MSA.

Examining Speed Marshal

Examining Speed Marshals perform the same duties as Speed Post Chiefs and are additionally empowered to assess and approve upgrades for other Speed Marshals.

Rescue and Medical

Doctors

All our race events need Doctors to provide the high level of emergency medical support that our competitors have come to expect.

We provide ongoing training and support to all of our team members to ensure that they do not find themselves in unfamiliar scenarios.

Any Doctors who are interested in joining our Medical team should email our Rescue Coordinator, Martin Hunt on rescue@barc.net in the first instance.

Paramedics

The BARC works with Paramedics as a key element of our Medical Team and provides exciting opportunities to attend some of the highest profile motorsport events in the world.

Once registered with the MSA, Paramedics benefit from medical malpractice insurance when working as a volunteer at an event.

Any Paramedics who are interested in joining our Medical team should email our Rescue Coordinator, Martin Hunt on rescue@barc.net in the first instance.

Rescue

The BARC operates nine Rescue Units around the country, which attend events of various types including races, sprints, hillclimbs and rallies. The purpose of a Rescue Unit is to get trained crewmembers and their equipment to the scene of an incident when called to assist. At a race circuit, this should be within 90 seconds of being dispatched.

Rescue crewmembers are Marshals who undergo training in medical skills, extrication and mechanical rescue.

They work with Doctors and Paramedics and use their knowledge and skills to extricate an injured or trapped driver.

The MSA requires that a Rescue Unit at a race meeting must have 3 licensed crew members and a Doctor or Paramedic. There can also be up to two trainees on the unit.

The BARC has minimum requirements for acceptance as a Rescue Trainee, these exceed the MSA minimum requirements and therefore you must have 2 years marshaling experience, have attended 2 Marshals training days including firefighting and preferably hold a valid first aid certificate.

If you meet the criteria and would like to become a Rescue Trainee then we will arrange for you to spend some time working on a Rescue Unit at events to see if you like it before committing to the large amount of time required to qualify.

If you are interested in joining BARC Rescue then please email our Rescue Coordinator, Martin Hunt on rescue@barc.net.

Non-Trackside

Marshals

Trainee Marshal

This is the level at which everybody starts marshalling. The grades are a way for other Marshals to gain an idea of your level of experience; they are not a reflection of your ability.

Upgrading from Trainee Marshal to Specialist Marshal requires you to have gained signatures for 15 days of marshalling of which 10 days need to be as a Specialist Marshal plus one training day covering specialist tasks, firefighting and basic marshalling, all of which are delivered at the BARC Marshals training days. Once you have completed this then an Examining Specialist will assess you. You will need to advise the BARC that you would like to be assessed so that they can notify the Chief Marshal for the event to make the arrangements for you. The assessments are in no way onerous and are intended to make sure that you are ready for the additional responsibility.

The assessment is an open discussion; it should be seen as a learning event with constructive criticisms being given during the day. These will ensure that you are ready for your upgrade and should round out the experience you have already gained.

Specialist Marshal

Specialist Marshals work in the areas of Pits, Paddock, Assembly Area and Startline and many Marshals split their time between Specialist and Track.

All of these areas involve a lot of contact with competitors, team members and the public. Specialist marshals will sometimes sign on at the same time as the other Marshals but usually earlier as they are involved with the earliest activities of the day.

The Paddock is where the competitors operate from between races; the Marshals must ensure that drivers and their cars reach the Assembly Area in good time. In the Assembly Area the Marshals will place the cars in the correct starting order, check the Scrutineering tickets and make sure that, before joining the track, drivers are correctly dressed and belted in to their car. Marshals in the Assembly Area may also have responsibility for assisting Scrutineers in Parc Ferme, which is where the cars go after their qualifying or race.

The Pitlane is a hazardous place during an event and Marshals here must be alert at all times. Pitlane Marshals are involved in activities such as recording pit stops, dealing with spills and incidents and operating speed guns.

Startline Marshals are principally responsible for making sure that competitors start from their correct grid position. They also deal with clearing the grid of non-competitors before races and provide warnings of stalled cars. They may also assist with lap charting and with penalty boards and flags.

To upgrade from Specialist Marshal to Experienced Specialist you will need to have signatures from 20 days of marshalling in your specialism. In addition you must have attended two training days covering the firefighting, first aid, specialism, report writing, communication and leadership modules from the MSA grading scheme.

Once you have collected the required number of signatures for attendance and training then you will need to ask the BARC to arrange for an upgrading assessment with an Examining Specialist.

Experienced Specialist

As an Experienced Specialist you will be taking the lead with tasks in your speciality and can expect to be mentoring other Marshals.

In order to upgrade to Examining Specialist you must collect 20 days signatures as Chief or Deputy Chief in your specialism together with attending two training days where MSA modules in report writing, communication, leadership and mentoring.

An upgrade to Examining Specialist requires that you are nominated by your club and must be approved by the MSA.

Examining Specialist

Examining Specialists perform the same duties as Experienced Specialists and are additionally empowered to assess and approve upgrades for other Specialist Marshals.

Other Officials

Clerk of the Course

The Clerk of the Course is the “ringmaster” who controls all aspects of the meeting from the moment that race entries start to arrive until the last result is finalised. At each meeting there will be a number of Clerks who are given responsibility for different aspects of the meeting from keeping to the timetable to taking action against drivers who break the MSA regulations. The Senior Clerk needs to ensure that everyone knows what their particular responsibilities are for the meeting and by doing so ensure that a fair and level playing field is provided for everyone who is taking part. A Clerk needs to have knowledge and understanding of the MSA regulations and this knowledge is then exhibited during a modular training programme which is usually complete in between 12 and 36 months.

Steward

The Stewards work as a panel of three with usually one appointed by the MSA, to be the chairman of the group with two appointed by the club to assist in undertaking certain responsibilities. Their main responsibility is in ensuring that the meeting is run as safely as possible and in accordance with the regulations laid down by the MSA. However in addition they act as a review body in the event that competitors are unhappy with a decision made by the Clerk. Stewards should have “extensive knowledge” of motor sport and like a Clerk undertake a modular training programme over a period of time before becoming an MSA Steward. Club stewards do not need to undertake the modular training but do need to have understanding of their role.

Scrutineer

Scrutineers are licensed MSA officials who attend all of our events and assist with the technical side of running the meetings.

The Scrutineers at each event examine every competing car for general safety, and also to make sure that the car complies with all the technical regulations of the race in which it will compete, and all the other technical requirements of the MSA Yearbook or the "Blue Book" as it is commonly called.

The driver's personal equipment (helmet and overalls etc.) are also examined to ensure that they are in good condition, and comply with the appropriate standards and regulations

Scrutineering has to be completed at every event before any competing car is allowed to commence practice.

If you are interested in becoming a member of our Scrutineering team, please contact our Officials Secretary, Paula Brown on pbrown@barc.net or call her on 01264 882210 and she will forward your details to our Chief Scrutineer for consideration.

Timekeeper

Timekeepers do exactly what their name suggests; they are licensed MSA officials who are required to keep full records of all the times achieved by the competitors during practice sessions, qualifying, heats and races. They use sophisticated electronic equipment to measure the times, including light beams, transponders and powerful computers. The times are compiled into results sheets, which are used to determine grid positions and race results.

If you are interested in becoming a member of a timekeeping team, , please contact our Officials Secretary, Paula Brown on pbrown@barc.net or call her on 01264 882210 and she will forward your details to a senior timekeeper for consideration.

MSA Grading Scheme

Training

Marshals Training

Each year the BARC runs training for Marshals at Croft, Harewood Hill, Mallory Park, Pembrey and Thruxton.

The training days include modules such as first aid, firefighting, incident handling, teamwork and flagging.

Contact the BARC Officials Secretary, Paula Brown, on pbrown@barc.net or call her on 01264 882210 to book your space for the next season.

Rescue Training

The BARC organises training for Rescue crewmembers throughout the year at venues around the country. The training is run by MSA Rescue training instructors and includes medical, extrication and mechanical rescue elements.

If you are interested in attending Rescue training then please contact Martin Hunt on rescue@barc.net